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Etherington, C. (n.d.). Open-source project spins up 3D-printed ventilator validation prototype in just one week. TechCrunch. Retrieved March 29, 2020, from https://techcrunch.com/2020/03/19/open-source-project-spins-up-3d-printed-ventilator-validation-prototype-in-just-one-week/

In a great example of what can happen when smart, technically-oriented people come together in a time of need, an open-source hardware project started by a group including Irish entrepreneur Colin Keogh and Breeze Automation CEO and co-founder Gui Calavanti has produced a coronavirus ventilator prototype using 3D-printed parts and readily available, inexpensive material. The ventilator prototype was designed and produced in just seven days, after the project spun up on Facebook and attracted participation from over 300 engineers, medical professionals and researchers.

The prototype will now enter into a validation process by the Irish Health Services Executive (HSE), the country’s health regulatory body. This will technically only validate it for use in Ireland, which ironically looks relatively well-stocked for ventilator hardware, but it will be a key stamp of approval that could pave the way for its deployment across countries where there are shortages, including low-income nations.

Etherington, C. (n.d.). Open-source project spins up 3D-printed ventilator validation prototype in just one week. TechCrunch. Retrieved March 29, 2020, from https://techcrunch.com/2020/03/19/open-source-project-spins-up-3d-printed-ventilator-validation-prototype-in-just-one-week/

Wonder whether the Irish are using the Validation Board, by the Lean Startup Machine, which is a tool to test assumptions for a coronavirus ventilator prototype. Coming up with new ideas is not the hardest part of true innovation. The hard part is to check if someone is waiting for it in the market. The Validation Board is based on Eric Ries’s Lean Startup methodology.

How do you know if your idea is as good as you think?  

  1. Hypothesis to validate: Write the hypothesis to validate in this activity. What do you expect to validate, confirm, verify with this work? What decisions do you need to make based on this research? Remember that the hypothesis must be falsifiable.
  2. Describe the validation technique: In which audiences will you validate (e.g. customers, distributors, subject matter experts, etc.)? What method will you use? (e.g. an experiment, a survey, a focus group, etc.) What tools, materials do you need (e.g. Prototype, question guide, questionnaire, etc.), etc.?
  3. Results And Analysis. Report the results and perform an analysis of the information you found.

Most likely you’ll make adjustments to your business model

View source article at Open-source project spins up 3D-printed ventilator validation prototype in just one week

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